Not just Holistic, but how to use E: All of the Above!

We made this blog because we did tons of research on success stories and research worldwide and used it on my dog with nasal cancer named Lucy. Oddly, my hobby is molecular biology. The treatment uses combination of health store supplements, some prescription meds, diet changes, and specific Ayurvedic and Chinese medicinal herbs. We just wanted her to have a better quality of life. We thought this combination of E: All the Above (except no radiation or chemo) would help that for sure, but it actually put her bleeding nasal cancer in remission!
Our approach to cancer is about treating the whole animals biologic system as natural as possible. But I do hate the word 'Holistic'. Sounds like hoo hoo. This is science based, research based data and results of using active herbal compounds that happen to be readily available and common. Some call it Nutriceuticals. Others may call it Orthomolecular cancer therapy.
WE FEEL DIVERSITY IN TREATMENT IS KEY:
-Kill the cancer cells
-Rid the cancer cells
-Remove the toxins it produces
-Make cancer cells become easier targets for the immune system
-Slow cancer cell reproduction
-Stimulate AND modulate the immune system
-Control secondary symptoms like bleeding, infection, inflammation, mucous, appetite, or pain for a better feeling animal.
-Working with your vet for exams and prescriptions that are sometimes needed when conditions are acute.
Just by using a multi-modal treatment approach that is as diverse in attack as possible. Both conventional and natural.
The body conditions that allowed it to develop in the first place must be corrected. If caught early enough, like with Lucy, this ongoing maintenance correctional treatment is all that was required at this point to achieve, so far, more than triple the life expectancy after diagnosis WITH remission. I did not use radiation or chemotherapy.
I hope this cancer research can help your dog.

February 14, 2012

Chinese Herbal Medicine for Dog Cancer

Chinese Herbal Medicine

Chinese Herbal Medicine is another branch of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). In fact, approximately 80% of all traditional Chinese medical patients are treated with herbs, while only the remaining 20% are treated with acupuncture or other manual therapies. Chinese Herbal Medicine has ancient roots in China. An archaeological dig in 1973 near Changsha, China revealed silk scrolls dating back to 168BC containing 170 different medicinal prescriptions to treat over 52 diseases. An ancient text dated 220AD, Jin Gui Yao Lue (Prescriptions of the Golden Cabinet) contains the formulation of a Chinese herbal prescription called Rehmannia 8 that is still commonly used in the West today.

Cost/Administration

Herbal medicines are typically quite inexpensive when compared to pharmaceutical drugs, although if tonic formulas are employed for a long period of time the price can add up. For a 50 pound dog, a typical tonic herbal formula will cost approximately $20/month. However, this is a small price to pay for the relief of symptoms and the strengthening of the body! Chinese herbal formulas come in a variety of forms including raw herbs, powdered herbs, liquids, capsules, and teapills. Teapills, small pea sized pills with a tough outer coating, are most often used for small animals, along with capsules and liquids, due to their ease of administration. Powders can also be mixed into foods, but cats are usually too suspicious to fall for that! Fortunately, most formulas come in a variety of forms so many options exist to accommodate both owner and pet.
Precautions
Although herbal medicines are not without any side effects, in general the side effects are mild and quickly resolve when the herb is withdrawn.  It is recommended to owners that the herbal formula be started slowly to monitor for any type of reaction. Typically a reaction just means the wrong herbal formula was chosen or the animal has an intolerance to a specific ingredient in the formula. Occasionally, a reaction will be seen after the animal has been on the formula for many months. This typically indicates that the formula is no longer needed and that the body is able to keep itself in balance without the herbs. Herbal formulas not sold under the Good Manufacturing Practices on label (GMP) should not be used, as these commonly are contaminated with heavy metals, pesticides, or pharmaceutical drugs. Occasionally, they will even contain endangered species. Most herbal formulas sold to herbal practitioners follow the GMP. However, products found in local Chinatown pharmacies are of questionable purity.


An example of Chinese Herbal Medicine for Dog Cancers are Stasis Breaker (a tumor buster) and Wei Qi Booster (immune booster) that I use.

Stasis Breaker Tumor Buster
Ingredients: 
Bai Hua She She Cao - Oldenlandia
Ban Zhi Lian - Scutellaria
E Zhu-Zedoaria
Mu Li(Shu)-Ostrea
San Leng-Sparganium
Zhe Bei Mu - Fritillaria



Classical Antecedent:

Nei Xiao Wan from Wei Sheng Bao Jian (Precious Mirror of Health) written by Luo Tian Yi in Yuan dynasty (1279-1368).
What is in Nei Xiao Wan
What is the Nei Xiao Wan formula composition?
A proprietary blend of
Bulbus Fritillariae Thunbergii
Radix Et Rhizoma Rhei
Radix Platycodi Grandiflori
Spica Prunellae Vulgaris
Radix Scrophulariae Ningpoensis
Radix Glycyrrhizae Uralensis
Radix Ampelopsis Japonicae
Radix Angelicae Sinensis
Fructus Aurantii
Sargassum
Fructus Forsythiae Suspensae
Radix Rehmanniae Glutinosae
Herba Menthae Haplocalycis
Natrii Sulfas
Radix Trichosanthis Kirilowii
Halite
Concha Meretricis Seu Cyclinae
(Bei Mu)
(Shu Da Huang)
(Jie Geng)
(Xia Ku Cao)
(Xuan Shen)
(Gan Cao)
(Bai Lian)
(Dang Gui)
(Zhi Qiao)
(Hai Zao)
(Lian Qiao)
(Di Huang)
(Bo He)
(Mang Xiao)
(Tian Hua Fen)
(Qing Yan)
(Hai Ha Fen)




Wei Qi Booster Immune Booster
Ingredients:
Oldenlandia - Bai Hua She She Cao

Scutellaria - Ban Zhi Lian
Citrus - Chen Pi
Angelica - Dang Gui
Codonopsis - Dang Shen
Astragalus - Huang Qi
Lindera - Wu Yao
Scrophularia - Xuan Shen.

Classical Antecedent:
Si Jun Zi Tang from Tai Ping Hui Min He Ji Ju Fang (Imperial Grace Formulary of the Tai Ping Era) written by Chen Shi Wen et al in 1080.
What is the Si Jun Zi Tang formula composition?
A proprietary blend* of
Radix Codonopsis Pilosulae
Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae
Sclerotium Poriae Cocos
Radix Glycyrrhizae Preparata
(Dang Shen)
(Bai Zhu)
(Fu Ling)
(Zhi Gan Cao)



Laboratory studies are expanding the clinical knowledge that is already documented in traditional texts. The herbs that are traditionally used for anti-cancer treatment and that are anti-angiogenic through multiple interdependent processes (including effects on gene expression, signal processing, and enzyme activities) include:

Artemisia annua (Chinese wormwood) (Artemisinin)

Viscum album (European mistletoe)
Curcuma longa (curcumin)
Scutellaria baicalensis (Chinese skullcap)
Resveratrol and proanthocyanidin (grape seed extract)
Magnolia officinalis (Chinese magnolia tree)
Camellia sinensis (green tea)
Ginkgo biloba
Quercetin
Poria cocos
Zingiber officinalis (ginger)
Panax (Red) ginseng
Rabdosia rubescens hora (Rabdosia)
Chinese destagnation herbs.

Natural health products target molecular pathways other than angiogenesis, including epidermal growth factor receptor, the HER2/neu gene, the cyclo-oxygenase-2 enzyme, the nuclear factor kappa-B transcription factor, the protein kinases, the Bcl-2 protein, and coagulation pathways. 


A number of Chinese botanicals display anti-cancer activity and
may be beneficial for a broad array of cancer patients, no matter what their TCM pattern indicates.37 38 Herbs such as astragalus and angelica activate the immune system and display antitumor activity. 39 Others, like Oldenlandia
diffusa, encourage apoptosis. 40 A meta-analysis evaluated the evidence from randomized trials concerning the combination of astragalus-containing Chinese herbal products with platinum-based chemotherapy. The literature analysis revealed improved survival, tumor response, and diminished toxicity as a result of the combination.41

My dog Lucy has been on these for many months for her nasal cancer and went into remission after 4 months on them (plus diet changes, other supplements and Low Dose Naltrexone) and still is today. The entire program I created for her uses diet, supplements, a minor prescription, and the above herbs. Kitchen sink, yes, but it is working.
Have your vet order that stuff (ONLY A VET CAN ORDER....) from (I am not affiliated with this herb company but it's the only herb compounds that I can find people having success with. So I am using it in addition to all the other herbs. And Lucy is still great)  http://www.tcvmherbal.com/
Go ahead and Google Stasis Breaker.


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