Not just Holistic, but how to use E: All of the Above!

I made this blog because I did tons of research on success stories and research worldwide and used it on my dog with nasal cancer named Lucy. So, now my hobby is molecular biology. The treatment uses combination of health store supplements, some prescription meds, diet changes, and specific Ayurvedic and Chinese medicinal herbs. I just wanted her to have a better quality of life. I thought this combination of E: All the Above (except no radiation or chemo and surgery for this cancer was not an option) would help that for sure, but it actually put her bleeding nasal cancer in remission!
My approach to cancer is about treating the whole animals biologic system. But I do hate the word 'Holistic'. Sounds like hoo hoo. This is science based, research based data and results of using active herbal compounds that happen to be readily available and common. Some call it Nutriceuticals. Others may call it Orthomolecular cancer therapy. Or Cancer Immunotherapy.
-Slow cancer cell reproduction
-Make cancer cells become easier targets for the immune system
-Kill the cancer cells
-Rid the cancer cells
-Remove the toxins it produces
- Stimulate and Modulate the immune system
-Control secondary symptoms like bleeding, infection, inflammation, mucous, appetite, or pain for a better feeling animal
-Working with your vet for exams and prescriptions that are sometimes needed when conditions are acute.
Just by using a multi-modal treatment approach that is as diverse in attack as possible. Both conventional and natural.
The body conditions that allowed it to develop in the first place must be corrected. If caught early enough, like with Lucy, this ongoing maintenance correctional treatment is all that was required at this point to achieve, so far, more than 10 TIMES the life expectancy given (more than 60 months) after diagnosis WITH remission. I did not use radiation or chemotherapy or surgery.
I hope this cancer research can help your dog as well.

My Lucy

My Lucy
In Loving Memory my Lucy December 2016
CURRENT STATUS - It was for more than 5 YEARS after Lucy was diagnosed by biopsy in March 2011 with nasal cancer that she lived. And she was in remission for 4 of 5 years using no radiation or chemo! Now multiply that by 7 to be 35 years extended!! She was 12.5 years old - equivalent to almost 90 human years old. She ended her watch December 1, 2016. I miss her so much.

July 22, 2013

Antioxidents and Chemotherapy

If you choose to do chemotherapy, this is important.

 If you give too much antioxidents when using chemo drugs that are using an oxidizing type drug, (or radiation) it could possibly lessen the effect. (it's complex and controversial even among oncologists and many studies) 
BUT not all chemo drugs work on a oxidizing basis.
Of course some use of antioxidents in any case would help minimize side effects and help the dog would tolerate it better. Double edge sword in these cases with some of those chemo drugs. But everything else I use would be important to support the dog.
Read these articles on the uses or non use of antioxidents during chemo and which drugs are problematic with antioxidents. This way you can make an actual informed choice, rather than get a blanket statement from a vet.

July 16, 2013

A popular dog treat could be

A popular dog treat could be possibly be contaminated by bacteria, according to a study published this month by researchers at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University and the University of Guelph.

The treat in question: the "bully" or "pizzle stick." The American and Canadian researchers analyzed the caloric density and bacterial contamination of these popular items, made from the uncooked, dried penis of a bull or steer. (EEWWW!)  They also administered a survey to pet owners to assess their knowledge of these treats.

The study, published in the January 2013 issue of the Canadian Veterinary Journal, examined 26 bully sticks purchased from retailers in the United States and Canada and made by different manufacturers.

All 26 treats were tested for bacterial contaminants. One (4 percent) of the sticks was contaminated with Clostridium difficile (a very difficult gut bacteria to get rid of-nasty) ; one (four percent) was contaminated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a type of staph bacteria that is resistant to certain antibiotics; and seven (27 percent) were contaminated with Escherichia coli, including one tetracycline-resistant sample.

The number of treats sampled was small and not all of these bacterial strains have been shown to infect humans. However, the researchers advise all pet owners to wash their hands after touching such treats, as they would with any raw meat or raw meat diets. The very young, elderly, pregnant, immunocompromised and other high-risk individuals should avoid all contact with raw animal-product based treats and raw meat diets, note the scientists.

To learn more about veterinarian and pet owner perceptions of dog foods and treats, the research team developed a 20-question Web-based survey. The survey was posted online for public participation for 60 days and all responses were anonymous. It was completed by 852 adults from 44 states and six countries. Most respondents were female dog owners.

Another surprising finding was the large number of people who did not know what bully sticks actually were. A higher proportion of veterinarians (62 percent) were able to correctly identify the source of bully sticks as bull penis compared to general respondents (44 percent). Twenty-three percent of the respondents fed their dogs bully sticks.

Further research with a larger sample size is needed to determine whether the calorie content and contamination rate found in this study is representative of all bully sticks, or other types of pet treats, according to the authors.

July 11, 2013

Anti-tumor effects of nitrosylcobalamin against spontaneous tumors in dogs

Anti-tumor effects of nitrosylcobalamin against spontaneous tumors in dogs.

Bauer JA, Frye G, Bahr A, Gieg J, Brofman P.


Bauer Research Foundation, Akron Innovation Campus, 411 Wolf Ledges Pkwy, Akron, OH 44311, USA. 



Given the limited options available to treat canine cancers, the use of companion animals for evaluating new drugs may identify better therapies for veterinary and human oncology. The anti-tumor effects of nitrosylcobalamin (NO-Cbl), an apoptosis-inducing, vitamin B12-based carrier of nitric oxide (NO), was evaluated in four dogs with spontaneous cancer.


(1) A 13 year-old female spayed Giant Schnauzer with inoperable thyroid carcinoma and hypercalcemia. (2) A 6 year-old male neutered Golden Retriever with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). (3) A ten yr-old neutered male Bichon Frise with apocrine gland anal sac adenocarcinoma (AGACA). (4) A 7 year-old female spayed Labrador mix with spinal meningioma following partial surgical resection. Tumor regression was measured by physical exam and verified using ultrasound (case 1) and MRI (case 2-4). Serum chemistries and hematologic parameters were monitored throughout the studies.


(1) The Giant Schnauzer demonstrated a 77% reduction in tumor volume after ten weeks of daily NO-Cbl treatment. (2) The Golden Retriever demonstrated a 53% reduction in tumor volume after 15 months of daily NO-Cbl therapy. (3) The Bichon Frise demonstrated a 43% regression of the primary tumor and a 90% regression of an iliac lymph node measured by MRI after 15 months of treatment. After 61 months, the dog currently has stable disease, normal liver enzymes, CBC analysis, and no evidence of toxicity. (4) The Labrador demonstrated complete regression of the residual tumor after 6 months of treatment.


We have shown previously that NO-Cbl is endocytosed by malignant cells, resulting in intra-tumoral NO release. In this study, we have shown that daily long-term use of NO-Cbl induced responses in all dogs without any signs of toxicity. The use of NO-Cbl capitalizes on the tumor-specific properties of the vitamin B12 receptor and represents a promising anti-cancer therapy.
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] 

Joseph A. Bauer, Ph.D., and colleagues described promising results with a drug called nitrosylcobalamin (NO-Cbl) in battling cancer in Oscar and three other canines without any negative side effects. While it gives profound hope to dog owners, NO-Cbl also points to a powerful new cancer treatment for humans — one that infiltrates cancer cells like a biological Trojan horse.

"We are one of the few research groups that is offering to treat dogs with cancer that otherwise have no hope," Bauer said. "With no other options available, most people in this situation opt to euthanize so that their pets don't go through the pain of disease and trauma of surgery."

About six million dogs are diagnosed with cancer each year in the United States. According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), pets with cancer provide a win-win opportunity for cancer researchers. Scientists can study new cancer treatments in animals other than lab mice. And pets get access to new treatments that provide hope and in instances like NO-Cbl, additional time.

Bauer put it this way: "The beauty of using a dog or a cat to test a cancer drug is two-fold. First, the animal can get the benefit of the most up-to-date drug in cancer medicine. Second, the NCI gets data on pets that are exposed to the same environmental factors their owners are. They breathe the same polluted air and drink the same polluted water that you and I do every day. If you can find an agent to treat cancer that occurs in a dog with success, there is a higher likelihood that you can take that to the human population and have a much higher response rate than with mice."

Although NO-Cbl has been used in only a few dogs, daily treatments have led to promising results in each case. "In all four dogs, there has been a significant reduction in tumor size without any toxic side effects or discomfort," says Bauer.

Oscar was the first success story. Since then, Bauer has treated two other dogs. A six-year old golden retriever named Buddy was unable to walk due to a spinal tumor pinching essential nerves leading to his right hind leg. After nine months of daily NO-Cbl treatment, Buddy's tumor shrank by 40 percent and he was going on two mile walks. A 13-year-old female Giant Schnauzer with inoperable thyroid carcinoma also showed tumor reductions of 77 percent in less than 10 weeks.

"Our case studies demonstrate anti-tumor efficacy with limited toxicity to normal tissues," Bauer added. "NO-Cbl sensitizes multidrug-resistant cancer cells to the antitumor effects of several different drugs, so it may be valuable when utilized in combination regimes," he added.

The drug targets cancer cells with "biological Trojan horse technology." Cells have receptors for vitamin B12 on their outer surface. The receptors serve as docking ports where molecules of the vitamin, essential for cells to divide and multiply, attach and then enter the cell. In order to divide at their abnormally rapid pace, cancer cells grow extra B12 receptors — 100 times more than normal cancer cells. Scientists have been trying since the 1950s to exploit that vulnerability and make B12-based drugs that attach to the receptors, sneak into the cell, and deliver a knock-out dose of medication.

Bauer and his colleagues from the Cleveland Clinic attached nitric oxide (NO) molecules to vitamin B12. NO kills cancer cells. The B12 acts as the Trojan horse, easily slipping into cancer cells. The subsequent release of toxic NO kills the cancer cells from within.

The team's goal is to successfully treat 10 dogs with NO-Cbl and slingshot the drug into human use as soon as possible. Because of the genetic similarity between dogs and humans, Bauer says his approach should have a much better chance of getting through the FDA's strict drug approval chain.

But Bauer stresses he wants to get the NO-Cbl dog treatment approved, as well. "I'm committed to the animals, and my goal would be to do a dual clinical trial, Phase One human and Phase One dog," says Bauer.

Oscar is still alive and well. Today, Bauer is treating another Golden Retriever named Haley with a spinal tumor.

"This is one of the most rewarding things I've ever done in my life," says Bauer, the owner of a two-year old Beagle. "It gets boring working in the lab, but to see the fruits of your labor in a positive outcome like this and to know you're responsible in some small way, that's pretty cool."

July 9, 2013

Lucy Nasal Cancer Status

Still fine.... YAY!!!! 

At the end of July, she will be 2 years in remission. It took 4 months for from start of Protocol (really just massive diet change and a lot of well researched supplements and the simple idea of DIVERSITY IN TREATMENT ATTACK) to get to remission.  

If you have any questions about the stuff I give her, it's ok to ask. Really. There is a contact form on the right side.