Not just Holistic, but how to use E: All of the Above!

I made this blog because I did tons of research on success stories and research worldwide and used it on my dog with nasal cancer named Lucy. So, now my hobby is molecular biology. The treatment uses combination of health store supplements, some prescription meds, diet changes, and specific Ayurvedic and Chinese medicinal herbs. I just wanted her to have a better quality of life. I thought this combination of E: All the Above (except no radiation or chemo and surgery for this cancer was not an option) would help that for sure, but it actually put her bleeding nasal cancer in remission!
My approach to cancer is about treating the whole animals biologic system. But I do hate the word 'Holistic'. Sounds like hoo hoo. This is science based, research based data and results of using active herbal compounds that happen to be readily available and common. Some call it Nutriceuticals. Others may call it Orthomolecular cancer therapy. Or Cancer Immunotherapy.
-Slow cancer cell reproduction
-Make cancer cells become easier targets for the immune system
-Kill the cancer cells
-Rid the cancer cells
-Remove the toxins it produces
- Stimulate and Modulate the immune system
-Control secondary symptoms like bleeding, infection, inflammation, mucous, appetite, or pain for a better feeling animal
-Working with your vet for exams and prescriptions that are sometimes needed when conditions are acute.
Just by using a multi-modal treatment approach that is as diverse in attack as possible. Both conventional and natural.
The body conditions that allowed it to develop in the first place must be corrected. If caught early enough, like with Lucy, this ongoing maintenance correctional treatment is all that was required at this point to achieve, so far, more than 10 TIMES the life expectancy given (more than 60 months) after diagnosis WITH remission. I did not use radiation or chemotherapy or surgery.
I hope this cancer research can help your dog as well.

My Lucy

My Lucy
In Loving Memory my Lucy December 2016
CURRENT STATUS - It was for more than 5 YEARS after Lucy was diagnosed by biopsy in March 2011 with nasal cancer that she lived. And she was in remission for 4 of 5 years using no radiation or chemo! Now multiply that by 7 to be 35 years extended!! She was 12.5 years old - equivalent to almost 90 human years old. She ended her watch December 1, 2016. I miss her so much.

November 30, 2013

Is there a list of what to give dog with nasal tumor and doses?

questions = Is there a list of what to give dog with nasal tumor and doses? I am reading and trying to put it all together but haven't seen just a list of what I need to get. Thank you in advance

Here is the link. 

November 26, 2013

Study finds gut microorganisms may determine cancer treatment outcome

NIH mouse study finds gut microorganisms may determine cancer treatment outcome


An intact population of microorganisms that derive food and benefit from other organisms living in the intestine is required for optimal response to cancer therapy, according to a mouse study by scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, and their collaborators.
NCI scientists found that tumors of germ-free mice (mice completely lacking these microorganisms), or mice treated with antibiotics to deplete the gut of bacteria, were largely impaired in their ability to respond to immunotherapy that slows cancer growth and prolongs survival. The mice were also impaired in their ability to respond to mainstay chemotherapy drugs such as oxaliplatin and cisplatin. These findings in mice may underscore the importance of microorganisms in optimal cancer treatment outcomes in humans. The study, led by Romina Goldszmid, Ph.D., staff scientist, NCI, and Giorgio Trinchieri, M.D., director of the Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, NCI, appeared Nov. 22, 2013, in Science.
Gut commensal microbiota are microorganisms that live in the gut and thrive but do not affect their host, in this case laboratory mice. Humans also harbor gut commensal microbiota that can influence local and body-wide inflammation as well as modify the tumor microenvironment, which consists of cells, signaling molecules and mechanisms that may support tumor growth and also cause drug resistance.
To study the importance of commensal bacteria, the scientists used mice raised in sterile conditions from birth so they did not harbor any bacteria, or alternatively, conventionally raised mice that received a potent antibiotic cocktail that is known to decrease bacteria by more than 10,000–fold. The mice received these antibiotics in their drinking water, starting three weeks prior to tumor inoculation. They continued to receive doses of the antibiotic cocktail throughout the experiment.
To analyze tumors at comparable stages of progression, lymphoma, colon, and melanoma cancers that could be transplanted were selected, based on their susceptibility to therapeutic drugs. Cancer cells from these tumors were then injected under the skin of the mice, where they formed tumors that grew to reach a diameter of one-fifth of an inch or more. The tumors were then treated with an immunotherapy that included CpG-oligonucleotides, which stimulated the immune system, or with the chemotherapy drugs oxaliplatin and cisplatin, which attacked the tumors.
Germ-free mice, or mice that received the antibiotic cocktail, responded poorly to drug therapy for their tumors. This resulted in a lower production of cytokines (proteins secreted by lymph cells that affects cellular activity and controls inflammation) as well as lower tumor death therefore demonstrating that optimal responses to cancer therapy required an intact commensal microbiota.
In an independent co-submitted study that will appear in the same issue of Science, Laurence Zitvogel, M.D., Ph.D., Gustave Roussy Institute, Paris, and colleagues showed that a different type of chemotherapy drug, cyclophosphamide, altered the composition of the intestinal microbiota and damaged the intestinal wall, thereby affecting optimal anti-tumor immune response and the therapeutic effectiveness of cyclophosphamide.
“The use of antibiotics should be considered as an important element affecting microbiota composition. It has been demonstrated, and our present study has confirmed, that after antibiotic treatment the bacterial composition in the gut never returns to its initial composition,” said Trinchieri. “Thus, our findings raise the possibility that the frequent use of antibiotics during a patient’s lifetime or to treat infections related to cancer and its side-effects may affect the success of anti-cancer therapy.”
In next steps, Goldszmid and Trinchieri will work in mice to fully characterize the molecular signaling by which the bacteria in the gut can actually send messages to distant organs or tumors and change the type and level of inflammation present in those organs. They also plan to characterize, in humans, the role of gut bacteria on the bodies’ inflammatory response and tumor response to therapy. Additionally, the researchers plan to design clinical studies by giving antibiotics to healthy volunteers to study their effect on the molecular mechanisms regulating inflammation.
The National Cancer Institute (NCI) leads the National Cancer Program and the NIH effort to dramatically reduce cancer and improve the lives of cancer patients and their families, through research into prevention and cancer biology, the development of new interventions, and the training and mentoring of new researchers. For more information about cancer, please visit the NCI website at or call NCI's Cancer Information Service at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237).
About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit

November 7, 2013

Questions Oct 12

*My responses to questions are in italics

> Hi Gary,
> Just to share with you my good news on ldn. I managed to convince the
> vet and we'll have it on prescription!! I'm so glad.

That's great!

I have also put the
> order with Swanson in USA for all the stuff from your list. So hopefully
> within next 3 days we shall start 'Tippner protocol' treatment and I believe
> strongly with success!!
> Unfortunately I received today information from the clinic where they did
> all tests that they also found some fungal in his nasal cavity, my vet
> couldn't confirm yet what kind of fungus and what treatment they can
> suggest. I am quite worried as it is very difficult to cure and it means
> more toxin for him and most important I don't know if it mightn't interfere
> with your protocol.

How was the test done for the fungal? If you do just a swab test, you
get alot of positives for all kinds of things. The nasal cavity will
have all kinds of bugs in it and many times will show Aspergillus in a simple swab test.
BUT, this is common. It's only a problem if the Aspergillus actually
gets into everything and the body is weak, then it can at later stages
be just as bad as cancer and yes it is hard and expensive to try to
cure. So, you just have to really know and ask what the real deal is.
On a positive note, the stuff I give Lucy to strengthen the immune
system also help battle all invaders. It won't interfere.

> He's still on 800 mg dosage of metronidazole (for his ibd condition) and I
> wonder if this also won't interfere with your protocol treatment. I know
> from your researches that ldn was also successful in treating crohn disease,
> so I'm hoping it might help our dog with this as well.

The Flagyl (the above metronidazole) won't interfere. It should help the fungal
condition problem, should have anyway. I couldn't handle the Flagyl when they gave it to me for my diverticulitis, it harsh for some people. The LDN Low Dosage Naltrexone helps the immune system by
boosting it and other stuff given helps by modulating it so it doesn't go
crazy high OR low.
Antibiotics kill stuff. Yours kill anaerobic bacteria and some
fungals. But the High IG Colostrum and cooking food in coconut oil can
really help kill Aspergillus fungus, bacterias, and such. The caprylic acids
in the coconut oil kill bad guys but oddly don't kill your good
bacteria in your gut. Be sure to supplement with those probiotics to
keep a good level of good bacteria in the gut. The antiobiotic kills
most bacterias so you must give probiotics hours between any antibiotics. You need good bacteria of many varieties to digest well and not inflame the gut. Also remember the intestine is one of the bigger immune defenses you have when it's happy.

> But the question is how soon I can take him off it to avoid bloody stools.
> What is your view on this and do you think the antibiotic won't ruin your
> treatment (ldn plus supplements)?

I don't know about taking off yet. You should give all this stuff a
chance to work and they maybe try to wean slowly off metro as a trial
and see what his stools are like. You will have to talk with your vet...

> And I have one more question, you don't mention anything about vit d3 and it
> is such a hit recently, so many good reports on so many conditions, cancer
> as we'll. I've started to give him 2500mcg, the dose I take, but maybe it
> is not right for some reasons?
Vets really don't want dogs to take it normally because they think dogs don't
need it if they get some sun. Well, todays dogs just dont spend all
their time outdoors much anymore. If you give too much dogs can get
kidney stones. I do give Lucy 5000mcg about once or twice a week.She
weighs about 90#. That's a huge amount of D. And no vet will
recommend this and in fact will say stop it. But I found the research
compelling in Vit D (it's really not a vitamin it's actually a hormone
used by every single process in the body). And I think dogs with
cancer need it. So that said we are all on our own. What is needed for life vs. what is needed optimally has a very wide spread!

> And last but not least... can you tell me how many successes has been
> reported back to you, I mean do people tell you how they're doing, re
> remission or not, just wonder?

Everyone so far (about 20-30 dogs I lost count) do much better after
doing all the stuff and most live much longer than what the vet said
would happen. The ones that died closer to the average, did really
well for a while but then crashed. These crashes tended to happen
because they were diagnosed late stage before even finding my site.
AND what was the common killer in some cases was not the cancer but
the dog would crash  and the vet would give too much Prednisone too
quickly and the dog and the owner could not take the side effects of
the Prednisone. So the dog would get put down. Vets REALLY need to
dose ramp upword on this med rather than shovel it in right off. The
others that were late stage suffered from seizures because the tumor
was located too close to the brain and had softened the bone and put
pressure there. Anti seizure meds were used but not effective enough,
so the owners put those dogs down. So if not late stage, all the other
dogs are either still alive well after diagnosis (some may still have
occassional minor bleeds) or died months after diagnosis of sometime
unrelated (sort of) causes due to stress on the body (they had other
health issues like diabetes, kidney problems, heart murmors, old age,
and such). I can't say this works on every dog. Some dogs won't take
the dang pills no matter how great a meal you give it in. Some dogs
are late stage. Some are too old to get the immune system back up. Some have other problems that
complicate things. Some vets are not on board with anything. 

I certainly will update you how my dog will be
> proceeding.
> Thanks again Gary, I'm so glad I found you and so grateful for what you're
> doing for all of us cancer pets sufferers.

I will share everything I learned.  Now if there was a
way to have one pill to give that would be great. But not possible....
The body is too complex to fix with one idea or one process to fix.Plus once you heat most plant herbs and supplements they don't work.


>>> Hi Gary, I didn't get back to you earlier as hoped to have more details
>>> from the  biopsy. I talked to the vet clinic where my dog underwent all tests
>>> and unfortunately the only information they were given from the lab was that
>>> it is lymphoma! I was told that I can request them to do more detailed tests
>>> but of course, it means another biopsy for my dog.
>> It's just odd. I can't find much info on lymphomas that are not blood
>> disorders.

>>> But as I have been reading now more about LDN it mentiones only T-cells
>>> and C-cells in their findings, so would you think it is absolutely crutial
>>> to know the type of cells found in his nasal cavity? Or would you still
>>> go ahead with the drug?
>> They are both cancer killing and immune boosting cells. So all good for
>> any kind of cancer or even immune related disorders. Many many people have
>> even found Low Dosage Naltrexone really helps with MS, which deep down is
>> really an autoimmune disorder that affects nerves.

>>> We're having an appointment with our local vet and I'm getting well
>>> prepared according to your guidelines (thank you so much for this!) and hope
>>> will get the prescription. Unfortunately there are NO compound pharmacies
>>> in this country (surely not in the part I live) so I can only tell vet that
>>> I take your route in preparing LDN from 50 mg tablets. So I'm a bit
>>> uncertain if he accepts this solution.
>> I know, stupid huh. Dog has cancer yet no one willing to try stuff or
>> comprimise. If you can find a Holistic vet they might be more receptive.
>> They are much more in tune and more informed on the biologic processes deep
>> down. understanding. That's what I had to do. My reg vet wouldn't budge.
>> That's the only way I can get the Rx for naltrexone and the 2 specific
>> chinese herbs Stasis Breaker and Wei Qi Booster.

  As you were saying the lymphoma in nose is so rare that I myself
>>> found only 1 reported case in 7yrs dog, but the results where not very
>>> clear.
>>> And the lady in Cambridge, Jane Dobson is top specialist in lymphoma, so
>>> we might get something what might be useful for his treatment.
>> I will have to look at that link. I mean chemo can help with lymphomas
>> maybe better than radiation, but essentially chemo will suppress the immune
>> system terribly. If ocologists would AT LEAST always focus on boosting the
>> immune system and striving for the healthiest most optimal biosystem
>> possible, then dogs might fare better and especially after chemo ended. But
>> they don't. So cancer bounces back harder after chemo because immune system is shot.

>>> I also would like to share my thoughts about what I think might caused
>>> the development cancer in his nose. Two years ago we were forced to leave
>>> him in the kennel which wasn't our usual place at our friends farm. These
>>> kennels demands certificates of all vaccines. So we went to vet and he told
>>> us that the basic vaccine kennel requires was kennel cough vaccine. So he
>>> was given nobivac into his nose! 7 days after he'd developed kennel cough
>>> and it wasn't just a minor side effects which they say it might happen after
>>> you get a vaccine. When I told them that I'm sure it is the vaccination
>>> which done and infected the illness to him I was laughed at and vet said
>>> that he has simply coughs kennel cough on the walk! He was really sick
>>> with high fever and horrible cough and had to be put on antibiotics etc.
>>> And I think from about that time he started to shake his head like something
>>> was bothering him, vet was telling us that probably it is due to his
>>> inflamed ears (that's one of the his conditions), and also from time had
>>> something like chocking-like single coughs-like. Always everything was
>>> related to his allergy- like symptoms, he has ever since with his skin
>>> irritations, possibly environmental.
>> I believe the same thing. Lucy got a nasal vaccine for same. I did what
>> everyone told me to do. All the pesticides on the skin, all the systemic
>> pesticides for heartworms, all every month. Gave not the cheapest but
>> reasonable kibble but it was not grain free and never added real food to it.
>> I think it all just adds up. 1 in 3 dogs will get cancer by age 10.
>> Somethings not right with that.

       The grain will cause skin and ear problems.
>>> Unfortunately I started to read the right literature, re proper feeding,
>>> vaccinations and dewormers only 2 yrs ago and it looks it is too late for
>>> him
>>> When I mentioned my thoughts to the clinic now vet didn't deny it and
>>> confirmed that some vaccines maybe cancerous and he cannot excluded as the
>>> reason but there is no proof! So I did ask him to somehow write about this
>>> case and make it the vet case. But whether he does it I doubt it. I wonder
>>> if whenever any tests were done on pets to check such a link, those with
>>> nasal cancers?

Every liner note with every vaccine says it might cause cancer or give to animals who are sick and it might cause alot of side effects. But the vet and those drug makers oddly does not have to do the long list of bad stuff a drug can do like our meds that the FDA makes drug ads almost comical to listen or read.

>> There is so little case followup it's bizzare. Other countries have better
>> results than our own. And they have no problem using just about anything and
>> researching it and then giving it. I hate to be a paranoid anti drug company
>> guy (I do believe in meds no problem really) it's just that it all seems so
>> myopic and narrow minded and treats only symptoms in most cases and there is like brainwashing in the way that vets
>> and doctors just seem to shovel what a company says works when in reality
>> the FDA or whatever government org approves this stuff it really doesn't
>> work that well. Like the FDA approval standard of "if more than 50% do
>> better", well that's better than placebo. So it's "effective". Really? Many
>> drugs are only marginally better than 50%! Wild!!!


The Low Dose Naltexone also really helped people with
>> Chrons and Infammitory Bowel disease as well.

 (English setter) have just been diagnosed
>>>> with nasal cancer, lymphoma.
>>> Lymphoma? Is this cancer on the inside of nose or on tip? Did they do a
>>> Xray or CT? Is Zak on any meds now?

>>>> The symptoms with bleeding heavily nose occurred 12 days ago, and today
>>>> biopsy results confirmed . The bleeding was only for 4 days and hasn't
>>>> occurred since. My question relates to Yunnan bai Yao. Do you give it all
>>>> the time to Lucy or only at the time of bleeding?
>>> I gave 1 pill am and 1 pill pm every day for 4 months until she went into
>>> remission of no bleeding and no nasal blockage and no weeping eye for at
>>> least a month. During bleeds I doubled the dose and for a few days after.
>>> Bleeds come and go because the tumour grows and breaks the feeder blood
>>> vessels as it pulls away. Yun nan helps greatly with the bleeding and
>>> therefore infection control (plus we don't have to freak out as much...),
>>> but until the tumor at a minimum at least stops growing the bleeds occur.
>>> The Yun nan help clotting factors but it is not really a clotting medicine,
>>> it simply helps the body do what it needs to do normally but much better.

>>>> Your site is absolutely great and hopefully when get him on your path
>>>> we can stop the cancer.
>>> Thanks! After she went into remission and still is, I thought I really
>>> should tell others that this works for my dog at least and show exactly why
>>> I give her what I give and all the research behind it.

>>>> Right now I m devasted by news and have to try firstly with et getting
>>>> LDN . I live in uk and all the supplements are not so easily available here.
>>> The LDN you will need to print out all the posts on that stuff I have and
>>> really understand how it works and then give to vet to read and gently but
>>> firmly keep trying to vet to Rx it. It very very low dose compared to usual
>>> dose AND what can it hurt at that dose. The dog has cancer for crying out
>>> loud! As far as I know ships all over the
>>> world and is where I get just about all the stuff. Except for the Stasis
>>> Breaker and Wei Qi Booster herb cans. I can only get those through a
>>> holistic vet. A Rx only herb only available from certain vets? Geez, what a
>>> racket.
>>> What is your dogs diet? It really needs to be grain free and higher
>>> protein and more fat than the usual foods. It must be low carb. I do this by
>>> simply adding 2 fried eggs in olive oil or coconut oil and chopped using the
>>> fry spatula and mixed in her food. Topped with some canned carrots, or green
>>> beans or chopped spinach. Plus I add a little fish oil. In eve I give some
>>> (maybe a few tablespoons) cottage cheese with a little gravy of liquid flax
>>> oil. Cancer loves carbs and grains. It can't use fats and protein as well to
>>> grow. Plus it grows most at night. So keeping blood glucose normalized and
>>> level during night by giving that high protein snack helps.
>>> The skin allergies will likely get better once you do not give any foods
>>> with grains in it. And the good fats will help. Dogs are carnivores. They
>>> are made for high protein medium fat diets.

>>> First, it's a very personal choice and I can only give my opinion on this. Radiation can work but it has kinda bad side effects, costs alot, and
>>> does not buy that much time. Chemo less expensive, but has same problems of
>>> not much time added and side effects plus it really kills the immune system
>>> at same time and makes animal sicker, so while cancer may go away for short
>>> while, it bounces back with great intensity once off chemo. We can't cut the
>>> cancer out. The nasal turbinates are too complex and it is horrible on the
>>> dog. And it grows back. So, while I thought for sure my dog was going to die
>>> in 4 to 6 months horribly (average time with no treatment), she didn't. She
>>> got better in 3 and was fine in 4 to 5. I don't know if this works on all
>>> dogs because of stage of cancer it this is early this really seems to help at a minimum give a quality of life and even hope. I was not hopeful. I was desperate. I got lucky.